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In the Kitchen

In the Kitchen

They say that the way to a man’s heart is through his stomach (and then, I believe, up through the chest cavity). But Mike did not marry me for my cooking skills. When we got together, I could prepare three meals: Tuna Helper, ramen noodles, and Kraft macaroni and cheese.

Even these I managed to screw up. Too much milk in the mac & cheese would leave it soupy; ramen noodles left on three minutes past their three-minute cook time; and Tuna Helper… well. It’s sad that that was even on my go-to list.

I was not good at producing substanance. If you’re not familiar, substanance is a common Turnerism. They came up with it by combining substance + sustenance. As in, “I’m really hungry; I need some substanance.”

Mike cooked more than I did in the beginning, probably because he couldn’t stomach much more of what I was putting on the table. But eventually I decided that I wanted to improve.

I bought the Better Homes New Cookbook. It’s a classic, the one with a background of a red and white checked tablecloth. It had basic recipes and was a great starting point.

A few friends knew what a disaster I was in the kitchen, so they bought me a bunch of kitchen gadgets. I remember staring at a garlic press with no idea how one might put such a tool to use.

I started experimenting with salads and learned to think beyond iceberg lettuce, tomatoes, and carrots. Through trial and error, I learned the art of making a hearty chowder.

There were so many disasters along the way. I remember trying to make a Sri Lankan noodle dish that a relative always brought to family gatherings. Mike and I each took a bite. It was immediately apparent that the food was inedible. Mike and I both like spicy foods, but I’d ruined the dish by not following a recipe and instead substituting my ignorance of good spice-to-noodle ratios. Mike, eyes tearing, said, “It’s really good,” and choked down a second bite.

My mother never liked cooking, nor was it her strong suit. Which one caused the other is a chicken-versus-egg question.

Incidentally, both my sister and I are now excellent cooks.

Trial & Error x Infinity = Proficiency

I learned to enjoy my time in the kitchen. It’s another creative outlet and, as with anything else, I improved over time.

My repertoire is much more diverse and no longer includes the packaged, processed foods. I can make a killer risotto, tri-tip marinade, lobster ceviche, and vegan enchiladas you’d swear weren’t vegan.

I think back to those early days and I’ll the times I said, “I can’t cook.”

What I meant to say was, “I can’t cook yet.”

Join The Community!

Join our Facebook GroupJoin the quest for “The Sweet Life.”  Request access to our Facebook Group.  Let’s learn from each other!  GO HERE

Free Audio Book Download

Full Unabridged Audio Book “Vagabonding With Kids” by AK Turner!  GO HERE

Take The SWEET LIFE Assessment

See how you score? Identify your strengths. Discover areas in your life you want to improve. GO HERE.

Giving Back

Amanda and Mike launched an Impact Club in their hometown of Boise, Idaho in 2017, and have had a blast gathering like-minded individuals, families, and organizations to make significant impact in our community, raising over $200,000 locally and over $1.5 million nationally.  

Join Our Next Monthly CHALLENGE

Every month Amanda and Mike pick a month-long challenge that pushes us out of our comfort zone so we can grow, learn, and become better versions of ourselves.  Sometimes we design our own unique challenge and other times we join pre-established challenges. Email us to find out about our next upcoming challenge. [email protected]

About Us

Our Story | Mike and Amanda TurnerWe are Mike and Amanda Turner, founders of “The Business of Us.” We are fierce advocates of helping entrepreneurial couples and families improve their lives, livelihoods, and legacies… READ MORE

It’s Never Too Late to Seek Your Full Potential

It’s Never Too Late to Seek Your Full Potential

I was reading a post by my friend Jim where he told a story about how he left some potential on the table when he was a young musician playing in a band in Los Angeles, because he was too consumed with partying and having fun.

Not many people are willing to be that honest about something like that. They instead blame the circumstances or people around them for why they ended up the way they did.

I love how Jim is actively doing something about it now to correct that mistake. It doesn’t matter if it’s days later or decades later, it’s never too late to seek your full potential.

I first witnessed a person leaving potential on the table when I was wrestling in high school. I had a friend who was an incredibly talented wrestler. So good that nobody on the team could come close to beating him. He had all the potential to win the state championship multiple times.

But he was more focused on having fun. Winning came a little too easy for him. Even school came easy to him, so he rarely had to study. Consequently, he didn’t push himself as much as he could have. It was hard for me to watch.

When I would hang out with him outside of school, he would just want to party, and he would really peer pressure me to join him. So much so, I stopped spending time with him.

There were a lot of circumstances working against my friend. His home life was not a stable one. He didn’t have a healthy supportive environment like I had. Which was part of the reason I was rooting for him so much. If he won a state title, he’d likely be able to get a scholarship to a great school and get out of his unhealthy home life.

If he had asked for help of any kind, I was ready to be there for him. But he never did.

Maybe that is why I love Jim’s story so much. It’s a redemption story.

It’s never too late to find your true potential.

Some doors indeed get shut and you can’t reopen them, but that has nothing to do with you committing to improve yourself today.

Don’t settle for being an armchair quarterback in life.
Don’t leave your full potential on the table.

Let’s keep moving, let’s keep training, let’s develop our full potential.

Join The Community!

Join our Facebook GroupJoin the quest for “The Sweet Life.”  Request access to our Facebook Group.  Let’s learn from each other!  GO HERE

Free Audio Book Download

Full Unabridged Audio Book “Vagabonding With Kids” by AK Turner!  GO HERE

Take The SWEET LIFE Assessment

See how you score? Identify your strengths. Discover areas in your life you want to improve. GO HERE.

Giving Back

Amanda and Mike launched an Impact Club in their hometown of Boise, Idaho in 2017, and have had a blast gathering like-minded individuals, families, and organizations to make significant impact in our community, raising over $200,000 locally and over $1.5 million nationally.  

Join Our Next Monthly CHALLENGE

Every month Amanda and Mike pick a month-long challenge that pushes us out of our comfort zone so we can grow, learn, and become better versions of ourselves.  Sometimes we design our own unique challenge and other times we join pre-established challenges. Email us to find out about our next upcoming challenge. [email protected]

About Us

Our Story | Mike and Amanda TurnerWe are Mike and Amanda Turner, founders of “The Business of Us.” We are fierce advocates of helping entrepreneurial couples and families improve their lives, livelihoods, and legacies… READ MORE

Life is boring without our blunders and absurdities

Life is boring without our blunders and absurdities

Someone very dear to me sent me this picture, with the simple caption, “This is lovely.” I agree. I don’t know why she sent this to me at the time that she did, but it fell in my inbox as if meant to be. Kismet. (And I don’t even believe in fate.)

“No one owns the day who allows it to be invaded with fret and anxiety.”

If I’m burdened with anxiety, I’m unable to own my day, to realize its potential.

“Finish every day and be done with it.”

Yes! It’s simple but profound and maybe just the reminder I need to be here and now and moving forward.

“Some blunders and absurdities, no doubt crept in. Forget them as soon as you can…”

There will always be blunders and absurdities. What a boring life I’d lead without them. Perfection has never been part of my aim, so why would I lament the blunders and absurdities? Aren’t they integral to my story?

“… tomorrow is a new day; begin it well and serenely, with too high a spirit to be cumbered with your old nonsense.”

Shedding the unhelpful worries of what was – I love it. And thinking of it as my “old nonsense” just makes me smile.

“This new day is too dear, with its hopes and invitations, to waste a moment on the yesterdays.”

I’m not a worry-free person. I’m no Bobby McFerrin. But it seems to me that there are fruitful and unfruitful worries.

The unfruitful, like worrying about the blunders and the absurdities and the old nonsense, yields nothing and instead hinders what joy I might find today.

The fruitful worries focus on realizing the day’s potential. Will I make the most of this day I have?

That doesn’t mean it has to include a Triathlon or financial windfall or some hallmark of success.

Maybe it means creating a memory with my twelve-year-old or a word that brightens someone’s day or the simple but beautiful act of just letting down my guard.

I don’t ever want to take those small moments for granted. In the greater context of life, they might seem like grains of sand compared to the beach. But remember, there’s no beach without the grains of sand.

Can I even call an apprehension about realizing the day’s potential a worry? Perhaps for a second, because it’s only there for a breath before it turns into motivation to soak in this day with all its promise (“its hopes and invitations”).

That worry = motivation = drive = some sort of positive yield. I’ll take it and I’ll be grateful for it. Blunders included.

Join The Community!

Join our Facebook GroupJoin the quest for “The Sweet Life.”  Request access to our Facebook Group.  Let’s learn from each other!  GO HERE

Free Audio Book Download

Full Unabridged Audio Book “Vagabonding With Kids” by AK Turner!  GO HERE

Take The SWEET LIFE Assessment

See how you score? Identify your strengths. Discover areas in your life you want to improve. GO HERE.

Giving Back

Amanda and Mike launched an Impact Club in their hometown of Boise, Idaho in 2017, and have had a blast gathering like-minded individuals, families, and organizations to make significant impact in our community, raising over $200,000 locally and over $1.5 million nationally.  

About Us

Our Story | Mike and Amanda TurnerWe are Mike and Amanda Turner, founders of “The Business of Us.” We are fierce advocates of helping entrepreneurial couples and families improve their lives, livelihoods, and legacies… READ MORE

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